CD43 is a sialoglycosylated membrane protein that is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. CD43 glycoforms that are recognized by the UN1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were expressed in lymphoblastoid T-cell lines and solid tumors, such as breast, colon, gastric, and squamous cell lung carcinomas, while unexpressed in the normal counterparts. The cancer-association of UN1/CD43 epitope suggested the possibility to use the UN1 mAb for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we show that the UN1 mAb was endowed with anti-tumor activity in vivo since its passive transfer inhibited the growth of UN1-positive HPB-ALL lymphoblastoid T-cells in mice. Further, we demonstrate that tumor inhibition was due to UN1 mAb-dependent NK-mediated cytotoxicity. By screening a phage displayed random peptide library we identified the phagotope 2/165 as a mimotope of the UN1 antigen, as it harboured a peptide sequence that was specifically recognized by the UN1 mAb and inhibited the binding of the UN1 mAb to UN1-positive tumour cells. Based on sequence homology with the extracellular region of CD43 (amino acids 64 to 83), the 2/165 peptide sequence was likely mimicking the protein core of the UN1/CD43 epitope. When used as vaccine in mice, the 2/165 phagotope raised antibodies against the UN1/CD43 antigen, indicating that the 2/165 phagotope mimicked the UN1 antigen structure, and could represent a novel immunogen for cancer immunotherapy. These findings support the feasibility to use monoclonal antibodies to identify cancer-associated mimotopes for immunotherapy.

Cancer-associated CD43 glycoforms as target of immunotherapy

Capuano C;Quinto I;Scala G;Fiume G;Palmieri C
2014-01-01

Abstract

CD43 is a sialoglycosylated membrane protein that is involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. CD43 glycoforms that are recognized by the UN1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) were expressed in lymphoblastoid T-cell lines and solid tumors, such as breast, colon, gastric, and squamous cell lung carcinomas, while unexpressed in the normal counterparts. The cancer-association of UN1/CD43 epitope suggested the possibility to use the UN1 mAb for tumor diagnosis and therapy. In this study, we show that the UN1 mAb was endowed with anti-tumor activity in vivo since its passive transfer inhibited the growth of UN1-positive HPB-ALL lymphoblastoid T-cells in mice. Further, we demonstrate that tumor inhibition was due to UN1 mAb-dependent NK-mediated cytotoxicity. By screening a phage displayed random peptide library we identified the phagotope 2/165 as a mimotope of the UN1 antigen, as it harboured a peptide sequence that was specifically recognized by the UN1 mAb and inhibited the binding of the UN1 mAb to UN1-positive tumour cells. Based on sequence homology with the extracellular region of CD43 (amino acids 64 to 83), the 2/165 peptide sequence was likely mimicking the protein core of the UN1/CD43 epitope. When used as vaccine in mice, the 2/165 phagotope raised antibodies against the UN1/CD43 antigen, indicating that the 2/165 phagotope mimicked the UN1 antigen structure, and could represent a novel immunogen for cancer immunotherapy. These findings support the feasibility to use monoclonal antibodies to identify cancer-associated mimotopes for immunotherapy.
2014
CD43; Cancer; Immunotherapy
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/14043
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 22
  • Scopus 31
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 30
social impact