Different data suggest the involvement of specific inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Cyclooxygenase (COX), which catalyses the production of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins, may play a significant role in seizure-induced neuroinflammation and neuronal hyperexcitability. COX-2 is constitutively expressed in the brain and also increased during/after seizures. COX-2 inhibitors may thus attenuate inflammation associated with brain disorders. We studied whether early long-term treatment (17 consecutive weeks starting from 45 days postnatal age) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib (10 mg/kg/day per os), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, was able to prevent/reduce the development of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats, a recognized animal model of absence epilepsy and epileptogenesis. Drug effects on the incidence, duration and properties of absence seizure spike-wave discharges (SWDs) were measured both 1 and 5 months after treatment withdrawal; furthermore, the acute effects of etoricoxib on SWDs in 6-month-old WAG/Rij rats were measured. Early long-term treatment (ELTT) with etoricoxib led to an similar to 40% long-lasting (5 months) reduction in the development of spontaneous absence seizures in adult WAG/RU rats thus exhibiting antiepileptogenic effects. Acutely administered etoricoxib (10 and 20 mg/kg i.p.) also had anti-absence properties, significantly reducing the number and duration of SWDs by similar to 50%. These results confirm the antiepileptogenic effects of COX-2 inhibitors and suggest the possible role of COX-2, prostaglandin synthesis and consequent neuroinflammation in the epileptogenic process underlying the development of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Antiepileptogenic effects of the selective COX-2 inhibitor etoricoxib, on the development of spontaneous absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats

Citraro Rita;Leo Antonio;Marra Rosario;De Sarro Giovambattista;Russo E
2015-01-01

Abstract

Different data suggest the involvement of specific inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Cyclooxygenase (COX), which catalyses the production of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins, may play a significant role in seizure-induced neuroinflammation and neuronal hyperexcitability. COX-2 is constitutively expressed in the brain and also increased during/after seizures. COX-2 inhibitors may thus attenuate inflammation associated with brain disorders. We studied whether early long-term treatment (17 consecutive weeks starting from 45 days postnatal age) with the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib (10 mg/kg/day per os), a selective COX-2 inhibitor, was able to prevent/reduce the development of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats, a recognized animal model of absence epilepsy and epileptogenesis. Drug effects on the incidence, duration and properties of absence seizure spike-wave discharges (SWDs) were measured both 1 and 5 months after treatment withdrawal; furthermore, the acute effects of etoricoxib on SWDs in 6-month-old WAG/Rij rats were measured. Early long-term treatment (ELTT) with etoricoxib led to an similar to 40% long-lasting (5 months) reduction in the development of spontaneous absence seizures in adult WAG/RU rats thus exhibiting antiepileptogenic effects. Acutely administered etoricoxib (10 and 20 mg/kg i.p.) also had anti-absence properties, significantly reducing the number and duration of SWDs by similar to 50%. These results confirm the antiepileptogenic effects of COX-2 inhibitors and suggest the possible role of COX-2, prostaglandin synthesis and consequent neuroinflammation in the epileptogenic process underlying the development of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/3920
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