BACKGROUND: The present systematic review was aimed at critically summarizing the evidence about interventions focused on circadian rhythms and mood symptoms in seasonal affective disorder (SAD). METHODS: A systematic search of the electronic databases PUBMED, PsycINFO and Web of Science was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Original papers reporting data about the effects of treatments on both mood and circadian rhythms disturbances in SAD patients were considered for inclusion. The quality of the evidence provided by the eligible studies was assessed using the Revised Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool (RoB 2.0) and the Cochrane Risk of Bias in Non-Randomized Studies of Interventions Tool (ROBINS-I). RESULTS: Forty papers were deemed eligible for the systematic review. The evidence of treatment outcomes referring to circadian disturbances was not robust. Despite this, bright light therapy (BLT) demonstrates to phase-advance delayed rhythms and to improve sleep-wake disorders. As for mood symptoms, both BLT and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) show evidence of efficacy. The possible connection between improvements of mood symptoms and changes in circadian outcomes seems controversial. LIMITATIONS: The included studies presented considerable methodological heterogeneity, small sample sizes and non-optimal sample selection. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of BLT in depressive symptoms and circadian disturbances of SAD was outlined by the present systematic review. The evidence about other biological and pharmacological treatments, although promising, should be replicated. A multifactorial etiopathogenesis could explain the heterogeneous clinical presentations of SAD and the complex link between mood and circadian symptoms.

Depressive mood and circadian rhythms disturbances as outcomes of seasonal affective disorder treatment: A systematic review

Steardo L;
2018-01-01

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The present systematic review was aimed at critically summarizing the evidence about interventions focused on circadian rhythms and mood symptoms in seasonal affective disorder (SAD). METHODS: A systematic search of the electronic databases PUBMED, PsycINFO and Web of Science was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Original papers reporting data about the effects of treatments on both mood and circadian rhythms disturbances in SAD patients were considered for inclusion. The quality of the evidence provided by the eligible studies was assessed using the Revised Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool (RoB 2.0) and the Cochrane Risk of Bias in Non-Randomized Studies of Interventions Tool (ROBINS-I). RESULTS: Forty papers were deemed eligible for the systematic review. The evidence of treatment outcomes referring to circadian disturbances was not robust. Despite this, bright light therapy (BLT) demonstrates to phase-advance delayed rhythms and to improve sleep-wake disorders. As for mood symptoms, both BLT and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) show evidence of efficacy. The possible connection between improvements of mood symptoms and changes in circadian outcomes seems controversial. LIMITATIONS: The included studies presented considerable methodological heterogeneity, small sample sizes and non-optimal sample selection. CONCLUSIONS: The effectiveness of BLT in depressive symptoms and circadian disturbances of SAD was outlined by the present systematic review. The evidence about other biological and pharmacological treatments, although promising, should be replicated. A multifactorial etiopathogenesis could explain the heterogeneous clinical presentations of SAD and the complex link between mood and circadian symptoms.
2018
Antidepressants; Bright light therapy; Circadian rhythms; Depressive symptoms; Seasonal affective disorder
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/58538
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