Home-based health care applications are rapidly gaining popularity, enabling a renewed focus on the design of low-power and low-noise front-end circuitry. In this context, the evaluation of low-frequency biomedical signals, such as the respiration pattern, benefits from the design of a front-end amplifier with reduced power consumption and low noise. Continuous efforts on improving the performances of respiration-monitoring devices have resulted in the reduction of noise and motion artefacts by increasing complexity (e.g. complex algorithms or high precision filtering) at the expense of increased power consumption. This study is focused on the design of a fully integrated charge amplifier for respiration monitoring based on a pyroelectric sensor. Simulation and test results show a power consumption of 1.8 μW, an active die area of 0.085mm2, a bandwidth in the range from 10 mHz to 13 kHz, and a remarkable noise efficiency factor of '1/42.79, which fits well with the development of an energy efficient wearable device.

Design of a charge amplifier for a low-power respiration-monitoring system

Pullano S. A.;Fiorillo A. S.;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Home-based health care applications are rapidly gaining popularity, enabling a renewed focus on the design of low-power and low-noise front-end circuitry. In this context, the evaluation of low-frequency biomedical signals, such as the respiration pattern, benefits from the design of a front-end amplifier with reduced power consumption and low noise. Continuous efforts on improving the performances of respiration-monitoring devices have resulted in the reduction of noise and motion artefacts by increasing complexity (e.g. complex algorithms or high precision filtering) at the expense of increased power consumption. This study is focused on the design of a fully integrated charge amplifier for respiration monitoring based on a pyroelectric sensor. Simulation and test results show a power consumption of 1.8 μW, an active die area of 0.085mm2, a bandwidth in the range from 10 mHz to 13 kHz, and a remarkable noise efficiency factor of '1/42.79, which fits well with the development of an energy efficient wearable device.
2019
amplifiers; biomedical electronics; energy conservation; health care; low-power electronics; medical signal processing; patient monitoring; pneumodynamics; power consumption; pyroelectric detectors
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/60004
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