Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most prevalent human pathogen and a persistent infection with this bacterium causes common pathologies, such as gastritis or peptic ulcers, and also less common but more serious pathologies, such as gastric cancer or gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The clinical outcome of gastrointestinal infection sustained by H. pylori is determined by the reciprocal interactions between virulence factors of the bacterium and host factors, including immune response genes. Although H. pylori induces a strong immune response, the bacterium is not eliminated. The eradication failure could be attributed to the bacterial capability to regulate helper T (Th) cell-related responses. H. pylori specific CD4+ T cells play a fundamental role in regulating host immunity and immunopathologic events. It has been documented that Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and T regulatory (Treg) cells, separately or in coordination with each other, can affect the outcome of the infection sustained by of H. pylori. Some studies indicated that both Th1 and Th17 cells may be protective or pathogenic, whereas Treg and Th2 cells perform anti-inflammatory impacts during H. pylori infection. This review gathers recent information regarding the association of the CD4+ T cells–mediated immunological responses and the clinical consequence of H. pylori infection.

T cell subsets play an important role in the determination of the clinical outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection

Larussa T.;
2018-01-01

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most prevalent human pathogen and a persistent infection with this bacterium causes common pathologies, such as gastritis or peptic ulcers, and also less common but more serious pathologies, such as gastric cancer or gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The clinical outcome of gastrointestinal infection sustained by H. pylori is determined by the reciprocal interactions between virulence factors of the bacterium and host factors, including immune response genes. Although H. pylori induces a strong immune response, the bacterium is not eliminated. The eradication failure could be attributed to the bacterial capability to regulate helper T (Th) cell-related responses. H. pylori specific CD4+ T cells play a fundamental role in regulating host immunity and immunopathologic events. It has been documented that Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and T regulatory (Treg) cells, separately or in coordination with each other, can affect the outcome of the infection sustained by of H. pylori. Some studies indicated that both Th1 and Th17 cells may be protective or pathogenic, whereas Treg and Th2 cells perform anti-inflammatory impacts during H. pylori infection. This review gathers recent information regarding the association of the CD4+ T cells–mediated immunological responses and the clinical consequence of H. pylori infection.
2018
Helicobacter pylori; Th1 cells; Th17 cells; Th2 cells; Treg cells; Helicobacter Infections; Helicobacter pylori; Humans; T-Lymphocyte Subsets; Treatment Outcome; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Immune Evasion
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/60159
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 71
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact