Purpose: Binge eating disorder (BED) has a considerable clinical relevance by virtue of its high numerous psychiatric and medical comorbidities; among the latter, the most frequent is obesity. Available treatments for BED have shown frequent relapse of binges or weight regain in the long term. The new combination of naltrexone and bupropion sustained release (NB) has proved to be effective for weight loss among obese patients. As NB acts on hypothalamic and reward circuits, that seem involved in the pathogenesis and maintenance of BED symptoms, this study aims to evaluate the efficacy of NB in improving pathological eating behavior and losing weight in BED patients. Methods: In this preliminary study, 23 obese-BED patients and a control group of 20 obese non-BED patients (respectively, Groups 1 and 2) who had previously undergone at least 5 unsuccessful weight-loss programs were treated with NB in addition to modified life style. Evaluation at t0 and after 16 weeks of treatment (t1) included anthropometric measurement, eating behavior assessment and psychopathological questionnaires (EDE-Q, BES, YFAS, BDI and STAI). Results: A significant and similar weight loss (ΔBMI% ≈ 8%) was evident for both groups. Pathological eating behavior (i.e., binge, grazing, emotional eating, craving for carbohydrates, and post-dinner eating), BES score and YFAS severity significantly improved, especially among BED. NB was well tolerated and drop-out rate was low. Conclusion: Treatment with NB, in addition to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity, seems an effective and well-tolerated option for improving pathological eating behavior and losing weight in obese-BED patients.

An open-label trial on the efficacy and tolerability of naltrexone/bupropion SR for treating altered eating behaviours and weight loss in binge eating disorder

Mariarita Caroleo;Marianna Rania;Renato de Filippis;Matteo Aloi;Franco Arturi;Cristina Segura-Garcia
Conceptualization
2020-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: Binge eating disorder (BED) has a considerable clinical relevance by virtue of its high numerous psychiatric and medical comorbidities; among the latter, the most frequent is obesity. Available treatments for BED have shown frequent relapse of binges or weight regain in the long term. The new combination of naltrexone and bupropion sustained release (NB) has proved to be effective for weight loss among obese patients. As NB acts on hypothalamic and reward circuits, that seem involved in the pathogenesis and maintenance of BED symptoms, this study aims to evaluate the efficacy of NB in improving pathological eating behavior and losing weight in BED patients. Methods: In this preliminary study, 23 obese-BED patients and a control group of 20 obese non-BED patients (respectively, Groups 1 and 2) who had previously undergone at least 5 unsuccessful weight-loss programs were treated with NB in addition to modified life style. Evaluation at t0 and after 16 weeks of treatment (t1) included anthropometric measurement, eating behavior assessment and psychopathological questionnaires (EDE-Q, BES, YFAS, BDI and STAI). Results: A significant and similar weight loss (ΔBMI% ≈ 8%) was evident for both groups. Pathological eating behavior (i.e., binge, grazing, emotional eating, craving for carbohydrates, and post-dinner eating), BES score and YFAS severity significantly improved, especially among BED. NB was well tolerated and drop-out rate was low. Conclusion: Treatment with NB, in addition to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity, seems an effective and well-tolerated option for improving pathological eating behavior and losing weight in obese-BED patients.
2020
Binge eating disorder; Eating behavior; Food addiction; Naltrexone/bupropion; Obesity; Weight loss.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/63612
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