Background: Blood flow restriction (BFR) training improves muscle strength and functional outcomes, but the proprioceptive implications of this technique in the rehabilitation field are still unknown. Objective: The present study aimed at assessing the effects of BFR in terms of stabilometric and balance performance. Methods: In this pilot randomized cross-over study, healthy young adults were included and randomly assigned to Groups A and B. Both groups underwent a postural assessment with and without wearing a BFR device. Study participants of Group A underwent postural baseline assessment wearing BFR and then removed BFR for further evaluations, whereas subjects in Group B performed the baseline assessment without BFR and then with BFR. Stabilometric and balance performance were assessed by the robotic platform Hunova, the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), the self-reported perceived balance (7-point Likert scale), and discomfort self-rated assessment. Moreover, the safety profile was recorded. Results: Fourteen subjects were included and randomly assigned to Group A (n: 7) and Group B (n: 7). Significant differences were shown in balance tests in static conditions performed on the Hunova robot platform in terms of average distance RMS (root-mean-square) with open eyes (OE), anteroposterior (AP) trunk oscillation range with OE, mediolateral (ML) average speed of oscillation with OE, and total excursion AP range with closed eyes (CE) (BFR: 3.44 ± 1.06; without BFR: 2.75 ± 0.72; p= 0.041). Moreover, elastic balance test showed differences in Romberg index (BFR: 0.16 ± 0.16; without BFR: 0.09 ± 0.07; p= 0.047). No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Taken together, our data showed that BFR affects balance performance of healthy subjects. Further studies are needed to better characterize the possible role of BFR treatment in the context of a specific rehabilitation protocol.

Effects of blood flow restriction on spine postural control using a robotic platform: A pilot randomized cross-over study

Ammendolia, Antonio;de Sire, Alessandro;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Blood flow restriction (BFR) training improves muscle strength and functional outcomes, but the proprioceptive implications of this technique in the rehabilitation field are still unknown. Objective: The present study aimed at assessing the effects of BFR in terms of stabilometric and balance performance. Methods: In this pilot randomized cross-over study, healthy young adults were included and randomly assigned to Groups A and B. Both groups underwent a postural assessment with and without wearing a BFR device. Study participants of Group A underwent postural baseline assessment wearing BFR and then removed BFR for further evaluations, whereas subjects in Group B performed the baseline assessment without BFR and then with BFR. Stabilometric and balance performance were assessed by the robotic platform Hunova, the Balance Error Scoring System (BESS), the self-reported perceived balance (7-point Likert scale), and discomfort self-rated assessment. Moreover, the safety profile was recorded. Results: Fourteen subjects were included and randomly assigned to Group A (n: 7) and Group B (n: 7). Significant differences were shown in balance tests in static conditions performed on the Hunova robot platform in terms of average distance RMS (root-mean-square) with open eyes (OE), anteroposterior (AP) trunk oscillation range with OE, mediolateral (ML) average speed of oscillation with OE, and total excursion AP range with closed eyes (CE) (BFR: 3.44 ± 1.06; without BFR: 2.75 ± 0.72; p= 0.041). Moreover, elastic balance test showed differences in Romberg index (BFR: 0.16 ± 0.16; without BFR: 0.09 ± 0.07; p= 0.047). No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: Taken together, our data showed that BFR affects balance performance of healthy subjects. Further studies are needed to better characterize the possible role of BFR treatment in the context of a specific rehabilitation protocol.
2023
Blood flow restrictions
balance
physiotherapy
postural assessment
rehabilitation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/90278
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