: Dysregulation of the gut microbiota and their metabolites is involved in the pathogenic process of intestinal diseases, and several pieces of evidence within the current literature have also highlighted a possible connection between the gut microbiota and the unfolding of inflammatory pathologies of the joints. This dysregulation is defined as the "gut-joint axis" and is based on the joint-gut interaction. It is widely recognized that the microbiota of the gut produce a variety of compounds, including enzymes, short-chain fatty acids, and metabolites. As a consequence, these proinflammatory compounds that bacteria produce, such as that of lipopolysaccharide, move from the "leaky gut" to the bloodstream, thereby leading to systemic inflammation which then reaches the joints, with consequences such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondylarthritis. In this state-of-the-art research, the authors describe the connections between gut dysbiosis and osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondylarthritis. Moreover, the diagnostic tools, outcome measures, and treatment options are elucidated. There is accumulating proof suggesting that the microbiota of the gut play an important part not only in immune-mediated, metabolic, and neurological illnesses but also in inflammatory joints. According to the authors, future studies should concentrate on developing innovative microbiota-targeted treatments and their effects on joint pathology as well as on organizing screening protocols to predict the onset of inflammatory joint disease based on gut dysbiosis.

Role of the Gut Microbiota in Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Spondylarthritis: An Update on the Gut–Joint Axis

Ammendolia, Antonio;de Sire, Alessandro
2024-01-01

Abstract

: Dysregulation of the gut microbiota and their metabolites is involved in the pathogenic process of intestinal diseases, and several pieces of evidence within the current literature have also highlighted a possible connection between the gut microbiota and the unfolding of inflammatory pathologies of the joints. This dysregulation is defined as the "gut-joint axis" and is based on the joint-gut interaction. It is widely recognized that the microbiota of the gut produce a variety of compounds, including enzymes, short-chain fatty acids, and metabolites. As a consequence, these proinflammatory compounds that bacteria produce, such as that of lipopolysaccharide, move from the "leaky gut" to the bloodstream, thereby leading to systemic inflammation which then reaches the joints, with consequences such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondylarthritis. In this state-of-the-art research, the authors describe the connections between gut dysbiosis and osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spondylarthritis. Moreover, the diagnostic tools, outcome measures, and treatment options are elucidated. There is accumulating proof suggesting that the microbiota of the gut play an important part not only in immune-mediated, metabolic, and neurological illnesses but also in inflammatory joints. According to the authors, future studies should concentrate on developing innovative microbiota-targeted treatments and their effects on joint pathology as well as on organizing screening protocols to predict the onset of inflammatory joint disease based on gut dysbiosis.
2024
gut microbiota
microbiota
osteoarthritis
rehabilitation
rheumatoid arthritis
spondylarthritis
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/94261
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