Background and objectives: This study aimed to assess the knowledge on antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and the antibiotic use among the general public in Southern Italy and to analyze whether sociodemographic characteristics could be associated with poor knowledge and improper practices.Methodology: From March to November 2019, a face-to-face interview was conducted with adult subjects attending the waiting room of 27 randomly selected general practitioners (GPs) in Southern Italy. The questionnaire covered sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge on antibiotics and AMR and practices regarding the consumption of and self-medication with antibiotics.Results: The response rate was 89.7%. In the sample, 29.2% thought that antibiotics are effective for viral infections, and 49.5% correctly recognized the definition of AMR. Predictors of good knowledge about antibiotics and AMR were female gender and a higher education level. Almost half of the respondents had used antibiotics in the previous year and 23.6% took antibiotics to treat a common cold and/or fever. Among participants, 25.5% reported to have bought antibiotics without a prescription, and 30.6% were classified as antibiotic self-medication users. Use of antibiotics in the previous 12 months and having taken an antibiotic after a phone consultation with the GP were positively associated with both antibiotic use for a common cold and/or fever and self-medication with antibiotics.Conclusions and implications: The findings of this study highlighted a considerable antibiotic consumption in the adult population of Southern Italy together with misconceptions regarding the correct indication for antibiotic use that could foster indiscriminate antibiotic use. Lay Summary: The findings of this study highlighted a considerable antibiotic consumption in the adult Italian population together with misconceptions regarding the correct indication for antibiotic use that could foster indiscriminate antibiotic use. Almost a quarter of the respondents took antibiotics to treat a common cold and/or fever and reported to have bought antibiotics without a prescription.

Knowledge and practices regarding antibiotics use: Findings from a cross-sectional survey among Italian adults

Bianco, Aida
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Licata, Francesca;Zucco, Rossella;Papadopoli, Rosa;Pavia, Maria
2020-01-01

Abstract

Background and objectives: This study aimed to assess the knowledge on antibiotics and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and the antibiotic use among the general public in Southern Italy and to analyze whether sociodemographic characteristics could be associated with poor knowledge and improper practices.Methodology: From March to November 2019, a face-to-face interview was conducted with adult subjects attending the waiting room of 27 randomly selected general practitioners (GPs) in Southern Italy. The questionnaire covered sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge on antibiotics and AMR and practices regarding the consumption of and self-medication with antibiotics.Results: The response rate was 89.7%. In the sample, 29.2% thought that antibiotics are effective for viral infections, and 49.5% correctly recognized the definition of AMR. Predictors of good knowledge about antibiotics and AMR were female gender and a higher education level. Almost half of the respondents had used antibiotics in the previous year and 23.6% took antibiotics to treat a common cold and/or fever. Among participants, 25.5% reported to have bought antibiotics without a prescription, and 30.6% were classified as antibiotic self-medication users. Use of antibiotics in the previous 12 months and having taken an antibiotic after a phone consultation with the GP were positively associated with both antibiotic use for a common cold and/or fever and self-medication with antibiotics.Conclusions and implications: The findings of this study highlighted a considerable antibiotic consumption in the adult population of Southern Italy together with misconceptions regarding the correct indication for antibiotic use that could foster indiscriminate antibiotic use. Lay Summary: The findings of this study highlighted a considerable antibiotic consumption in the adult Italian population together with misconceptions regarding the correct indication for antibiotic use that could foster indiscriminate antibiotic use. Almost a quarter of the respondents took antibiotics to treat a common cold and/or fever and reported to have bought antibiotics without a prescription.
2020
Italy
antibiotic use
antimicrobial resistance
public
self-medication
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/66286
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