Purpose: The diagnosis of a disease such as breast cancer (BC) can be experienced as a sudden, unexpected, and life-threatening event accompanied by considerable uncertainty. This experience can precipitate the development of post-traumatic symptoms and depression. Conversely, certain individuals exhibit the capacity to reframe this traumatic event and transform it into an opportunity for personal growth. Existing research shows that individuals with high trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) tend to experience fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS), and greater post-traumatic growth (PTG). The aim of this study was to investigate the interrelationship among these variables and specifically examine whether PTS and PTG play a mediating role between trait EI, depression, and life satisfaction. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to 338 women with BC to assess trait EI, PTS, PTG, depression, and life satisfaction. Results: Results highlighted that trait EI was negatively related to PTS and depression and positively related to PTG and life satisfaction. In addition, both PTS and PTG showed a mediating role in the relationship between trait EI, depression, and life satisfaction. This study highlights the close link between depressive symptoms and post-traumatic cognitions in women with BC. Conclusion: Current findings highlight links between trait EI, PTS, PTG, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. Clinicians could use these findings when developing interventions aimed at alleviating PTS, such as low mood and worry, and facilitating PTG. This study demonstrated that trait EI can reduce PTS and increase PTG, therefore it is important to include programs aimed at fostering trait EI.

Structural links from trait emotional intelligence to life satisfaction and depressive symptoms in women with breast cancer: post-traumatic responses as mediators

Cannavo', Marco;Barberis, Nadia
2024-01-01

Abstract

Purpose: The diagnosis of a disease such as breast cancer (BC) can be experienced as a sudden, unexpected, and life-threatening event accompanied by considerable uncertainty. This experience can precipitate the development of post-traumatic symptoms and depression. Conversely, certain individuals exhibit the capacity to reframe this traumatic event and transform it into an opportunity for personal growth. Existing research shows that individuals with high trait emotional intelligence (trait EI) tend to experience fewer post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTS), and greater post-traumatic growth (PTG). The aim of this study was to investigate the interrelationship among these variables and specifically examine whether PTS and PTG play a mediating role between trait EI, depression, and life satisfaction. Methods: Questionnaires were administered to 338 women with BC to assess trait EI, PTS, PTG, depression, and life satisfaction. Results: Results highlighted that trait EI was negatively related to PTS and depression and positively related to PTG and life satisfaction. In addition, both PTS and PTG showed a mediating role in the relationship between trait EI, depression, and life satisfaction. This study highlights the close link between depressive symptoms and post-traumatic cognitions in women with BC. Conclusion: Current findings highlight links between trait EI, PTS, PTG, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. Clinicians could use these findings when developing interventions aimed at alleviating PTS, such as low mood and worry, and facilitating PTG. This study demonstrated that trait EI can reduce PTS and increase PTG, therefore it is important to include programs aimed at fostering trait EI.
2024
Breast cancer
Depression
Post-traumatic growth
Post-traumatic stress
Trait emotional intelligence
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/92426
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