Background: Differentiating Progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson's syndrome (PSP-RS) from PSP-Parkinsonism (PSP-P) may be extremely challenging. In this study, we aimed to distinguish these two PSP phenotypes using MRI structural data. Methods: Sixty-two PSP-RS, 40 PSP-P patients and 33 control subjects were enrolled. All patients underwent brain 3 T-MRI; cortical thickness and cortical/subcortical volumes were extracted using Freesurfer on T1-weighted images. We calculated the automated MR Parkinsonism Index (MRPI) and its second version including also the third ventricle width (MRPI 2.0) and tested their classification performance. We also employed a Machine learning (ML) classification approach using two decision tree-based algorithms (eXtreme Gradient Boosting [XGBoost] and Random Forest) with different combinations of structural MRI data in differentiating between PSP phenotypes. Results: MRPI and MRPI 2.0 had AUC of 0.88 and 0.81, respectively, in differentiating PSP-RS from PSP-P. ML models demonstrated that the combination of MRPI and volumetric/thickness data was more powerful than each feature alone. The two ML algorithms showed comparable results, and the best ML model in differentiating between PSP phenotypes used XGBoost with a combination of MRPI, cortical thickness and subcortical volumes (AUC 0.93 ± 0.04). Similar performance (AUC 0.93 ± 0.06) was also obtained in a sub-cohort of 59 early PSP patients. Conclusion: The combined use of MRPI and volumetric/thickness data was more accurate than each MRI feature alone in differentiating between PSP-RS and PSP-P. Our study supports the use of structural MRI to improve the early differential diagnosis between common PSP phenotypes, which may be relevant for prognostic implications and patient inclusion in clinical trials.

Differentiating between common PSP phenotypes using structural MRI: a machine learning study

Quattrone, Andrea;Sarica, Alessia;Buonocore, Jolanda;Morelli, Maurizio;Bianco, Maria Giovanna;Calomino, Camilla;Aracri, Federica;De Maria, Marida;Vescio, Basilio;Vaccaro, Maria Grazia;Quattrone, Aldo
2023-01-01

Abstract

Background: Differentiating Progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson's syndrome (PSP-RS) from PSP-Parkinsonism (PSP-P) may be extremely challenging. In this study, we aimed to distinguish these two PSP phenotypes using MRI structural data. Methods: Sixty-two PSP-RS, 40 PSP-P patients and 33 control subjects were enrolled. All patients underwent brain 3 T-MRI; cortical thickness and cortical/subcortical volumes were extracted using Freesurfer on T1-weighted images. We calculated the automated MR Parkinsonism Index (MRPI) and its second version including also the third ventricle width (MRPI 2.0) and tested their classification performance. We also employed a Machine learning (ML) classification approach using two decision tree-based algorithms (eXtreme Gradient Boosting [XGBoost] and Random Forest) with different combinations of structural MRI data in differentiating between PSP phenotypes. Results: MRPI and MRPI 2.0 had AUC of 0.88 and 0.81, respectively, in differentiating PSP-RS from PSP-P. ML models demonstrated that the combination of MRPI and volumetric/thickness data was more powerful than each feature alone. The two ML algorithms showed comparable results, and the best ML model in differentiating between PSP phenotypes used XGBoost with a combination of MRPI, cortical thickness and subcortical volumes (AUC 0.93 ± 0.04). Similar performance (AUC 0.93 ± 0.06) was also obtained in a sub-cohort of 59 early PSP patients. Conclusion: The combined use of MRPI and volumetric/thickness data was more accurate than each MRI feature alone in differentiating between PSP-RS and PSP-P. Our study supports the use of structural MRI to improve the early differential diagnosis between common PSP phenotypes, which may be relevant for prognostic implications and patient inclusion in clinical trials.
2023
Cortical thickness
MRPI
Machine learning
Progressive supranuclear palsy-Parkinsonism
Progressive supranuclear palsy-Richardson’s syndrome
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12317/93965
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